Embassy of Tunisia

New Delhi, India

About the Embassy

India-Tunisia relations have been traditionally cordial and friendly. An Indian Mission at the level of a Cd’A was set up in Tunis in 1963, with the first Ambassador being posted in 1976. Tunisia opened its Mission in New Delhi in 1981.

Tunisian leaders have always praised the Indian leadership and openly acknowledge the support India extended to Tunisia in its freedom struggle. Tunisian Foreign Office publicly acknowledges that ‘moderation’ is the hallmark of Tunisia’s foreign policy. Moreover, the Government perceives fundamentalism as a major threat and is desirous of cooperating with India in controlling the spread of fundamentalism and terrorism. In October 1995, India and Tunisia issued a “Joint Declaration on Combating International Terrorism, Drug Trafficking and Organised Crime”. India and Tunisia have taken a common stand on this question in international fora.

Ambassador’s Activities

Embassy Officials

H.E.M NEJMEDDINE LAKHAL

Ambassador Extraordinary & Plenipotentiary
Tel: +91 1126145346/49
Fax:+911126145301

Mr. JAMEL BOUJDARIA

Counsellor /Deputy Chief of Mission
Tel: +91 1126145346/49
Fax:+911126145301
boujamel@yahoo.com

Mr. MONGI DRISSI

First Secretary
Tel: +91 1126145346/49
Fax:+911126145301
mongidrissiN1974@gmail.com

Former Ambassadors of the Republic of Tunisia In India

India-Tunisia relations have been traditionally cordial and friendly. The diplomatic relations between the two countries was set up in 1958. Tunisia opened its Mission in New Delhi in 1981.

Hereafter the list of the former Ambassadors of the Republic of Tunisia in India:

Name & surname Period
H.E Mr Mohamed Elyes BEN MARZOUK 2010-2011
H.E Mr Raouf CHATTY 2007-2009
H.E Mr Elyes KASRI 2001-2006
H.E Dr. Sahbi BASLY 1999-2001
H.E Mr Abdelaziz CHAABENE 1994-1999
H.E Mr Hammadi BEN REJEB 1991-1994
H.E Mr Ali TEKAYA 1987-1991
H.E Mr Ahmed Ouneis 1981-1987

Location Guide for the Embassy

Adresse du Pere Noel 2021 : Embassy of Tunisia
A9/A6 Vasant Vihar, New Delhi
India
Tel : 0091-11-26145346/49
Fax : 0091-11-26145301

Working Hours

Saturday & Sunday off

Week Days

Monday 9:00 AM  -5:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM  -5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM  -5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM  -5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM  -5:00 PM

During the Holy Ramadan

Monday 9:00 AM  - 4:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM  - 4:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM  - 4:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM  - 4:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM  - 4:00 PM

List of Holidays

S. No. TUNISIAN HOLIDAYS DATE NUM. OF DAYS
1 FIRST OF JAN. 01 JAN 1
2 MOULED 03 JAN 1
3 THE TUNISIAN REVOLUTION DAY 14 JAN 1
4 THE NATIONAL DAY (INDEPENDENCE) 20 MARCH 1
5 MARTYRS DAY 09 APRIL 1
6 The LABOR DAY 01 MAY 1
7 THE REPUBLIC DAY 25 JULY 1
8 WOMEN’S DAY 13 AUG 1
9 EVACUATION DAY 15 OCT 1
10 AID EL FITR DEPEND ON MOON 2
11 AID EL ADHA DEPEND ON MOON 2
S. No. INDIAN HOLIDAYS DATE NUM. OF DAYS
1 THE REPUBLIC DAY 26 JAN 1
2 THE HOLY 13    MARCH 1
3 THE INDEPENDENCE DAY 15 AUGUST 1
4 MAHTMA GANDHI B’DAY 02 OCT 1
5 DUSSEHRA 30 SEPTEMBER 1
6 DIWALI 19 OCTOBER 1
7 CHRISTMAS DAY 25 DEC 1

Consular Services

Profile of Tunisia

The Republic of Tunisia

Officially Name : The Republic of Tunisia
Location: North Africa
Area : 162.155 square kilometers ,
Bordered: by Algeria to the west, Libya to the southeast, and the Mediterranean Sea to the north and east.
Population as of July,2017: 11446,3 million.
Capital city, Tunis, located on the country’s northeast coast.
Geography: Tunisia contains the eastern end of the Atlas Mountains and the northern reaches of the Sahara desert. Much of the rest of the country’s land is fertile soil and 1,300 kilometres (810 mi) of coastline .
Tunisia has an association agreement with the European Union, the Arab Maghreb Union, the Arab League, and the African Union.
14th of January 2011, revolution of the Tunisian citizens resulted in the overthrow of the autocratic President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali followed by the country’s first free elections. Since then, Tunisia has been consolidating democracy. The country adopted a new constitution and held its first Parliamentary elections since the 2011 Arab Spring on October 26, 2014, and its Presidential on November 23, 2014.

Tunisian Government

NAME DESIGNATION
Mr: Youssef Chahed President of the Government
Mr. Ghazi Jéribi Minister of Justice
Mr. Abdelkerim Zbidi Minister of  National Defence
Mr. Lotfi Brahem Minister of Interior
Mr Khemaies Jhinaoui Minister of Foreign Affairs
Mr Ahmed Adhoum Minister of Religious Affairs
Mr. Ridha Chalghoum Minister of  Finance
Mr.Zied Laadhari Minister of Development, Investment and International Cooperation
Mr Mabrouk Korshid Minister of State Property and Real Estate Affairs
Mr Slim Feriani Minister of Medium and Small Enterprises
Mr Omar Al Bahi Minister of Trade
Mr Riadh El Moakhar Minister of  Local Affairs and Environment
Mr. Hatem Ben Salem Minister of Education
Mr. Slim Khalbous Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research
Mr Khaled Kaddour Minister of Energy, Mining and Renewable Energies
Mr. Samir Taieb Minister of Agriculture, Water Resources and Fishery
Mohamed Salah Arfaoui Minister of Equipment, Housing and territorial management
Mrs. Majdouline Cherni Minister of Sport and Youth
Mrs. Naziha Laabidi Minister of Women, Family and Children
Mr. Imed Hammami Minister of Health
Mr. Mohamed Trabelsi Minister of Social Affairs
Mr. Faouzi Abderrahmane Minister of Vocational Training and Employment
Mr. Anouar Maarouf Minister of Communication Technologies and Digital Economy
Mrs. Selma Elloumi Rekik Minister of Tourism and Handicraft
Mr. Mohamed Zine El Abidine Minister of Culture
Mr. Radhouan Ayara Minister of Transport
Mr. Mehdi Ben Gharbia. Minister in charge of the relations with the Constitutional institutions , Civil Society and Human Rights
Mr. Iyed Dahmani Minister to the Head of Government in charge of Relations with the parliament (ARP)
Mr. Taoufik Rajhi Minister to the Head of Government in charge of  Major Reforms
Mr Sabri Bachtobji State Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs
Mr Hatem Char Eddine El Ferjani State Secretary to the Minister of  Foreign Affaires in Charge of Economic Affairs
Mr Hichem Ben Hmed State Secretary to the Minister of Trade  in Charge of External trade
Mr Chokri Bel Hasen State Secretary to the Minister of  Local Affairs and Environment
Mr Khalil Laamiri State secretary to the minister of Higher Education and Scientific  Research
Mr Hachem Hmidi State Secretary to the  Minister of Energy, Mining and Renewable Energies
Mr Abdallah Errabhi State Secretary to the  Minister of Agriculture, Water Resources and Fishery
Mr Abdelkoddous Saadaoui State Secretary to the Minister of Sport and Youth in charge of Youth
Mr Imed Jabri State Secretary to the Minister of Sport and Youth in charge of Sport
Mrs Sonia Bechikh State Secretary to the Minister of Health
Mr Adel Jarboui State Secretary to the minister of  Social Affairs in charge of  the emigration and the Tunisian abroad
Mrs Sayida Ounissi Secretary of State to the Minister of Vocational Training and Employment in charge of vocational training and special initiative
Mrs. Sarra Rjeb State Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Tunisia Culture


The culture of Tunisia is a product of more than three thousand years of history and an important multi-ethnic influx. Ancient Tunisia was a major civilization crossing through history; different cultures, civilizations and multiple successive dynasties contributed to the culture of the country over centuries with varying degrees of influence. Among these cultures were the Carthaginian -their native civilization, Roman, Vandal, Jewish, Christian, Arab, Islamic, Turkish, and French, in addition to native Berbers. This unique mixture of cultures made Tunisia, with its strategic geographical location in the Mediterranean, the core of some great civilizations of Mare Nostrum.

The history of Tunisia reveals this rich past where different successive Mediterranean cultures had a strong presence. After the Carthaginian Republic, the Roman Empire came and left a lasting effect on the land with various monuments and cities such the El-Jem Amphitheater and the archaeological site of the ancient city of Carthage, which is classified as a world heritage site. El Jem is just one of seven world heritage sites found in Tunisia.

After a few centuries of the presence of Christianity, represented by the Church of Africa, the Arab Islamic conquest transformed the whole country and founded a new city called Al-Qayrawan, Al-Qayrawan is a renowned center for religious and intellectual pursuits.

With the annexation of Tunisia by the Ottoman Empire, the center of power shifted from Tunis to Istanbul. This shift in power allowed the local government of the new Ottoman Province to gain more independence, which was maintained until the institution of the French Protectorate (which was later seen as occupation). The protectorate introduced elements of Western – French – culture.

The important elements of Tunisian culture are diverse and represent a unique, mixed heritage. This heritage can be experienced first-hand in: museums such as the Bardo Museum, the contrast and diversity of city architecture such as Sidi Bou Said or the medina of Tunis, cuisine such as cheeses and French croissants, music reflecting Andalusian and Ottoman influences, literature, cinema, religion, the arts, and sports and other areas of Tunisian culture.

Mosaic

Musical instrument

Art

Calligraphy

India-Tunisia Bilateral Relations

Tunisia has traditionally maintained cordial and friendly relations with India since establishment of diplomatic relations in 1958. The Tunisian Embassy in New Delhi was set up in 1981.The first resident Indian Mission at the level of Cd’A was established in Tunisia in 1963 and raised to the Ambassador level in 1976.

India accounts for around 50% of Tunisia’s global phosphoric acid exports. The annual bilateral trade during 2015 was US$ 340.25 million.

Several Indian compagnies in Tunisia:

KEC International Ltd and Jyoti Structures Ltd, electric transmission lines.

Mahindra: Assembly of pickup trucks (1200 vehicles per yearwith a target to produce up to 2500 per year).

TATA Motors : Production of pick-up trucks with ‘Le Moteur’ and ‘Icar’.

Dabur has a toothpaste manufacturing project worth around US$ 7 million.

Exchange visits between the two countries:

Visit in Tunisia:

1964: H.E President Zakir Hussain (July)

1984: H.E Mrs. Indira Gandhi, Prime Minister of India

1984: H.E M. Hidayatullah, Vice-President of India ( May)

1992: H.E Mr Narasimha Rao Prime Minister of India

1999: Former Prime Minister I.K. Gujral.

2009: Mr R.Chandrashekhar, special Secretary, Ministry of IT

2012: H.E Mr E. Ahmed, MOS (EA), 11th session of the India Tunisia Joint Commission In addition (April 2012, Tunis)

2013: H.E. Mr. Kumar Jena, Sate Minister of Chemical Product & Fertilizer (mars 2013)

2013: H.E Mr Selman Khourchid, Minister for Foreign Affairs of India (May 22)

2015: H.E Mr. Anil Wadhwa Secretary (East) for Foreign affairs India (April 29th to 2 May 2015) (3rd Tunisia-India Political consultations )

                    H.E Mr. Santosh Kumar Gangwar, Minister for Textiles and Special Envoy of Prime Minister of  India,  (3rd India Africa Forum Summit).

Visit in India:

1982: Mrs Wassila Bourguiba, First Lady of Tunisia ( November)

1983: H.E Mr Mohamed Mzali,Prime Minister of Tunisia

1991: H.E Mr Habib Boulares Ministry of Foreign Affairs

2000: H.E Mr Habib Ben Yahiya Ministry of Foreign Affairs (December)

2009: H.E Mrs Lamia Chefai Sghaeir, State secretary in charge of IT, internet and software

2012: H.E Mr Moncef Ben Salem, Minister of High Education and Scientific Research

2012: Mr Alaya Bettaieb State Secretary, Tunisian Ministry of Investment and International Cooperation (8th session of Indian Africa summit)

2015: H.E Mr Noomane Fehri, Minister for Communication Technologies and Digital Economy of Tunisia, ( June 29, 2015 in New Delhi).

         H.E Mr Taieb Baccouche Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Tunisia  (the 3rd India Africa Forum held in New Delhi from 26 to 29 October 2015).

2016: H.E Mr Mongi Marzoug Minister of Energy and Mines (IAHC 2016).

A Joint Working Groups have been created in the following sectors:

(i) Information and communications Technology,

(ii) Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs),

(iii) Drugs and Pharmaceuticals,

(iv) Hydrocarbon sector, and

(v) Textiles,

Oct 2008: 4th session of the working group on Pharmaceuticals products and medicines.

Mars 2009: first session of working group in textile sector.

Nov 2011: 2rd session of the working group on science and technology.

May 2013: 3rd Second of the working group on science and technology.

Nov 2013: 5th session of the joint committee on Pharmaceuticals products and medicines.

Agreements and MOUs have been signed between India and Tunisia.

Tunisian Indian Joint venture

Tunisian- indian Joint venture on Phosphate sector (TIFERT)
Mahindra in Tunisia
Tata Motors in Tunisia

Several Indian companies have a presence in Tunisia. KEC International has secured orders from the Société Tunisienne de l’Electricité et du Gaz (STEG) dealing with the transmission line project in Tunisia.